Relax. Let the Minerals Do the Work

Pools along the Colorado River at Iron Mountain Hot Springs

Relax. Let the Minerals Do the Work

While your whole body relaxes in a hot spring, specific minerals in the water provide the chemistry that boosts healthy relaxation and stress relief deep in your nerves and muscles, including your heart and blood vessels.

Relaxing at Iron Mountain Hot SpringsMagnesium is an especially important mineral for hundreds of processes, especially in the muscles where it helps certain proteins lengthen, relaxing the muscles, after calcium has triggered contraction. In the smooth muscles of your blood vessels, this improves circulation; in your heart muscle, it improves function; in your skeletal muscles, it eases tension. Experts say men need 420 milligrams of magnesium daily while women need 320 milligrams. All adults need 1,000 milligrams of calcium, which is another of the minerals in Iron Mountain water. Calcium is important for bone strength as well as muscle function.

Relaxation, stress relief and natural healing depend on effective communication between your brain and your muscles, which depends on sodium and potassium. When you don’t have enough of these minerals, the poor communication leaves you feeling weak. Adults need about 1.5 grams of sodium and 4.7 grams of potassium a day.

The energy for your muscle contraction and relaxation depends on iron, which helps transport and store oxygen to fuel the work. Your body has 4 grams of iron, mostly in red blood cells. Men need to get 8 milligrams a day; women need 18 milligrams.

Relaxation is work for your body’s muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. Minerals make sure that work goes smoothly, so you can enjoy the buoyant warmth of the hot spring water and leave rejuvenated and refreshed.

The water at Iron Mountain Hot Springs contains 14 dissolved minerals that promote health and healing. To learn more about the wellness benefits of soaking in geothermal springs, visit www.ironmountainhotsprings.com.

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Gene Stowe

Gene Stowe

Gene Stowe was a reporter for The Charlotte (N.C.) Observer for 13 years and head of the writing program at Trinity School at Greenlawn, a four-time U.S. Department of Education Blue Ribbon School in South Bend, Ind., for 10 years before he became a full-time freelance writer in 2008. His first book, Inherit the Land: Jim Crow Meets Miss Maggie’s Will, was published in 2006. He lives in Monroe, N.C.
Gene Stowe

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