Mineral Spotlight: Chloride

The mineral chloride is one of 14 healing minerals found in Iron Mountain Hot Springs

Mineral Spotlight: Chloride

Chloride is one of the 14 naturally-occurring dissolved minerals found in the geothermal waters at Iron Mountain Hot Springs.

Chloride (Cl) is the negatively charged mineral ion of chlorine—No. 17 on the Periodic Table without the dangerous properties of the gas chlorine—which does not naturally occur in isolation. Chloride bonds easily with positively-charged ions, especially sodium and potassium and when the compounds like salt (sodium chloride) are dissolved in water the ions separate. A liter of Iron Mountain Hot Springs water contains 13,200 milligrams of chloride.

Chloride is necessary for life. Your body contains about 155 milligrams of chloride, a major electrolyte that accounts for 70 percent of its negative ions. It is distributed throughout your body, including blood, lymph and the fluids in and around your cells. As a negative ion, it provides a balance to the positive ions inside your cells, mostly potassium, and outside your cells, mostly sodium. In your stomach, it combines with hydrogen to make hydrochloric acid that helps digest food. In the blood, it helps maintain pH balance and carry away waste carbon dioxide. In the nervous system, it is involved in the transmission of electrical impulses.

Most people need 1.8 to 2.3 grams of chloride a day. Chances are you’re getting plenty. In addition to salt and the salt substitute potassium chloride, it’s found in seaweed, rye, tomatoes, lettuce, celery and olives. A 2015 study showed that transdermal magnesium chloride improved the quality of life for women suffering with fibromyalgia.

Soak in the healing benefits of all 14 minerals at Iron Mountain Hot Springs.

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Gene Stowe

Gene Stowe

Gene Stowe was a reporter for The Charlotte (N.C.) Observer for 13 years and head of the writing program at Trinity School at Greenlawn, a four-time U.S. Department of Education Blue Ribbon School in South Bend, Ind., for 10 years before he became a full-time freelance writer in 2008. His first book, Inherit the Land: Jim Crow Meets Miss Maggie’s Will, was published in 2006. He lives in Monroe, N.C.
Gene Stowe

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